Home » Folk Artists: The Highwaymen, Royal Robertson, Nan Phelps, Bob Justin, Howard Finster, K Roly Doncsecz, Oscar W. Peterson, Sulton Ro by Source Wikipedia
Folk Artists: The Highwaymen, Royal Robertson, Nan Phelps, Bob Justin, Howard Finster, K Roly Doncsecz, Oscar W. Peterson, Sulton Ro Source Wikipedia

Folk Artists: The Highwaymen, Royal Robertson, Nan Phelps, Bob Justin, Howard Finster, K Roly Doncsecz, Oscar W. Peterson, Sulton Ro

Source Wikipedia

Published August 13th 2011
ISBN : 9781155351629
Paperback
26 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 24. Chapters: The Highwaymen, Royal Robertson, Nan Phelps, Bob Justin, Howard Finster, K roly Doncsecz, Oscar W. Peterson, Sulton Rogers, William Jesse Ramey, Maud Lewis, Andrew Clemens, Bhand, Natalie D-Napoleon, Charles Henry Granger, D ra Keresztes, Robert Butler, Omkar Das Manikpuri, Mary Michael Shelley, William Edmondson, Maxwell Mays, Rodney Hardee, Mary Louise Defender Wilson, Tofail Ahmed, Lillian Colton, John Paul Daniel, Leo Smith, Jakob Klukstad, Mayer Kirshenblatt, Mary Ann Willson, Edgar Tolson, Jaime Crespo, Galang Rambu Anarki, Sam Doyle, Midde Ramulu, Marian Ulc, Justus DaLee. Excerpt: The Highwaymen, also referred to as the Florida Highwaymen, are a group of 26 named and listed landscape artists who have been called The Last Great American Art Movement of the 20TH century. This group of self taught and self mentoring African American artists, were able to define themselves against the many odds, racial and cultural barriers of the time in which they painted, and created a body of work of over 200,000 paintings. For over 50 years, The Highwaymen, a loose association of twenty-six African American artists from Fort Pierce, Florida, USA, who began painting in the early 1950s and into 1960s, created large numbers of relatively inexpensive landscape paiintings, which were created using construction materials rather than traditional art supplies. As no galleries would accept their works, they sold them in towns and cities and along roadsides throughout Florida often still wet, out of the trunks of their cars. Their success and longevity is remarkable considering they began their career in the racially unsettled and violent racial times of the 50s in Florida, and the social conditions of the Jim Crow South, the stirrings of civil rights movement in Florida was only just beginning. In 1970 one of the original members ...